Snoopers’ Charter


  NO2ID Press Release – IMMEDIATE 4th November 2015 The new draft surveillance bill is like an iceberg, with a vast bulk of technical change obscured beneath the surface, according to civil liberties organisation NO2ID[1]. Theresa May presented the Investigatory Powers Bill [2] to parliament today as a measure “consolidating and updating our investigatory powers, strengthening the safeguards”. But it amounts to a dramatic alteration in the powers already available not just to the intelligence services, but to police, tax inspectors, and officials and regulators in almost every department of state [3]. It replaces several pieces of complex and technical legislation. Guy Herbert General Secretary for NO2ID, said: “I would have more sympathy for the Home Secretary if she did not resort to glib hypotheticals about kidnapped children. This is not a proposed bill that is easy to understand or straightforward in effect.” “The much trumpeted change in oversight focuses […]

NO2ID on IP Bill: Government expects parliament to swallow an ...



1
Dan Hyde reports in the Daily Telegraph that Home Secretary Theresa May has indicated that a law to allow snooping on personal email accounts and internet browsing, could be pushed through now that the Conservatives have a parliamentary majority. Her comments were made in the early hours of Friday morning as the Conservatives appeared to heading for a majority.  Previously the so-called  Snoopers’ Charter had been blocked by the Conservatives coalition partners the Liberal Democrats. However, with the Conservatives having only a slim majority, Theresa May could potentially still have an up hill struggle to get the controversial measures through.

Theresa May to Resurrect the Snoopers’ Charter



Kevin Rawlinson reports on the BBC news website that an attempt by four peers to include clauses from the defunct Communications Data Bill (the Snoopers’ Charter) in the Counter Terrorism Bill, has been aborted following a lack of support from other peers. The attempt by the peers to sneak in the clauses was widely condemned by privacy groups and the Internet Service Providers Association (ISPA). However, BBC news understands they will try again next week, unless the Home Office publishes a government redraft of the bill.

“Snoopers’ charter” revival on hold


2
Patrick Wintour reports in the Guardian that a cross-party alliance of lords are attempting to force a revised version of the so called “Snoopers’ Charter” into law via an amendment to Counter Terrorism Bill. The amendment introduces into the Counter Terrorism Bill clauses lifted from the now defunct Communications Data Bill, which was abandoned by the Coalition Government in 2013 following a campaign by privacy groups and the refusal of the Liberal Democrat’s to support it. The amendment has been proposed by a group that includes a former Conservative defence secretary, a former Metropolitan police commissioner, a former Labour defence minister and a Liberal Democrat peer.  Surprisingly, they did not discuss the amendment with the government beforehand.  If passed the amendment will give the Home Secretary new powers to require internet service providers to retain their customer’s web data and disclose it to public authorities on request. The amendment to […]

Lords attempt to revive the ”Snoopers’ Charter”