internet of things


An article on the Techdirt website about the ease with which a Smart Kettle can be hacked has highlighted the dire state of device security for the ‘Internet of Things’. The iKettle by allows users to remotely turn it on from anywhere using a Smartphone App.  However, researchers have pointed out that the Kettle is relatively easy to hack especially if the user has not configured the kettle properly.  The company that produces the iKettle has said its associated Android and iOS APPs would be upgraded to eliminate the security vulnerabilities.  However, there is still the wider problem of ‘Internet of Things’ devices opening up vulnerabilities in people’s home networks, especially where device security is an afterthought. The advice the researchers give is to not put ‘Internet of Things’ devices on your network unless you are absolutely sure they are secure.

Easily Hacked Kettle Highlights the Lack of ‘Internet of Things’ ...


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Benny Evangelista and Peter Fimrite report on the SFGATE website that a bill is to be put forward in the Californian Assembly to force smart TV makers to give customers the ability to opt out of features that could monitor their conversations. The bill is being put forward by Assemblyman Mike Gatto, who amongst other things is concerned about the ability of smart TV’s to be turned into tools that determine what kind of adverts viewers see.  Gatto said: “It’s not just that you could be sent bankruptcy ads after you talk with your wife about financial problems while watching television, it’s what happens if someone hacks it.” He also highlights the privacy issues if a smart TV is listening in a room where a couple are getting intimate. “Those sounds, if you had your voice recognition on, is what would be included,” Gatto said. “That’s what’s disturbing about this.” […]

Bill seeks ban on Smart Televisions becoming ‘Big Brother’