data loss


Karl Thomas reports on the Welivesecurity website that local authorities in Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Suffolk have suffered more than 160 data breaches in the past year. Most incidents were the result of human error, such as e-mails and letters being misaddressed. However, in one astonishing case a filing cabinet containing sensitive files was sold following an office move, although the files were subsequently recovered from the buyer.

Eastern England Councils in Slew of Data Breach Errors


John Leyden reports on the Register website that South Wales Police have been fined £160,000 for losing DVDs of an interview with a sex abuse victim and not reporting the loss for nearly two years. The unencrypted DVDs were left in a desk drawer and the loss was discovered after an office move in October 2011.  It emerged during the investigation that South Wales Police had no specific force-wide policy for the safe storage of victim and witness interviews. Commenting on the case Anne Jones, ICO Assistant Commissioner for Wales said: “Without any doubt we would expect a professional police force, in a position of trust, dealing with this type of highly sensitive information from victims and witnesses on a daily basis, to have robust procedures to keep track of the personal data in their care.”  

Welsh Police Force Fined £160,000 after Losing Sensitive Video Interview


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Following a series of high-profile losses of customer’s personal data suffered by major companies such as Sony, Home Depot and Target, Erik Sherman considers on the CBS Moneywatch website why companies do not improve IT security and safeguards for customer data. The answer is that although the cost of remediation and fixes following such data leaks looks enormous to the average person, the financial impact on companies is negligible.  For example, when Target lost 40 million credit card numbers and 70 million other records, the cost after deductions was 105 million dollars which is less than 0.1 percent of the company’s revenue. Even the reputational damage to companies from huge data losses seems relatively short-lived.  Following a major breach of Sony’s network the Ponemon Institute polled consumers every 48 hours to check the company’s reputation.  After less than six months the Sony’s reputation had recovered its place to where it […]

The reasons companies don’t fix cyber security